Metabolic Types and Hair Testing

Metabolic Types and Hair Testing

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Hair testing will show the person’s metabolic type also known as the oxidation rate. Both those with a  fast or slow metabolism can suffer from inefficient energy production, but for opposite biochemical reasons.

Why Is the Oxidation Rate Important?
Once the oxidation rate of an individual is determined, the goal is normalize the oxidation rate through both a diet recommendations and the correct nutrient supplementation. These supports will give the body more overall energy to heal and release deeply stored heavy metals.

The Two Types – Slow and Fast Oxidation
There are two main metabolic types identified in a HTMA test, which are SLOW or FAST metabolism (slow or fast oxidizers). If carbohydrates and amino acids are oxidized too slowly, this means slow metabolism. If carbohydrates and amino acids are oxidized to cycle this is known as fast metabolism, energy production is reduced. There can also be mixed oxidation types shown in hair testing from some labs.

Both slow and fast oxidation types suffer from inefficient energy production, but for opposite biochemical reasons:

  • Slow oxidation is associated with chronic low blood sugar. A slow oxidizer who metabolizes food at a rate slower than that required for
    the production of optimal energy levels. The metabolic rate shows us how much energy weare producing on a cellular level. Slow oxidation is basically a defensive holding pattern. The body is in a state of defense against stress – it has gone into a protective shell to ward off any demands on its mineral reserves.
  • Nearly 75% to 80% of all people are in a slow oxidizer pattern. The body is in a state of defense against stress – it has gone into a protective shell to ward off any demands on its mineral reserves.
  • Fast oxidizers tend to crave fats, butter and red meat, foods which slow the metabolic rate. They may also crave sweets or carbohydrates if they do not eat enough fats and oils.

Slow Oxidation Patterns: Symptoms and conditions associated with a slow oxidation include:

  • AIDS
  • Allergies (low histamine)
  • Anorexia
  • Asthma
  • Anorexia
  • Carbohydrate cravings
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Easy weight gain
  • Fatigue
  • Fungus/Candida/Yeast Infections
  • HypoadreniaHypotension
  • Hypoadrenia
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Insulin resistance or Type 2 Diabetes
  • Osteopenia and osteoporosis
  • Poor digestion
  • PMS – Premenstrual Syndrome
  • Ulcers (gastric)
  • Viral infections

High Tissue Calcium is always seen in the slow oxidizer pattern. Some of the functions of calcium are:

  • Cell permeability regulation, in excess it reduces cell permeability.
  • Thyroid and parathyroid activity. Calcium inhibits thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH).
  • Hormone secretion, including female hormones and insulin secretion to a degree.
  • Muscle and nerve contraction and relaxation.
  • Fat digestion.
  • Detoxification – calcium antagonizes lead and cadmium.
  • High tissue calcium individuals with low potassium indicates a copper toxicity problem.
  • Copper forces potassium out of cells and builds up tissue calcium. This gets further exacerbated by adding in vitamin D. The Vitamin D pushes calcium up further and potassium down further.
  • Copper toxicity lowers potassium. A sodium to potassium inversion can occur from copper dumping. You get a loss of potassium from inside the cells from excreted copper.
  • In light of this, high tissue calcium (excess) reduces adrenal gland function and, or the ability to produce adrenal gland hormones in order for the body to retain the necessary magnesium to attempt to balance the high calcium levels.
  • When the adrenal hormones (mineralocorticoids) are suppressed, sodium and potassium are continually lost in the urine. Therefore, high calcium usually has an elevated magnesium plus low sodium and low potassium. This indicates both slow adrenals and a slow thyroid at the cellular level.

About Slow Metabolic Types: These are the Key Features

  • Parasympathetic Dominant
  • Thyroid Function Decrease: A tendency toward decreased thyroid function and reduced secretion of hormones.
  • Adrenal Function Decrease: A tendency toward decreased adrenal function and reduced secretion of hormones.
  • Diet: Dietary factors such as low protein intake, high carbohydrate intake and eating refined carbohydrates, especially those containing appreciable amounts of sugar have an indirect yet significant effect in suppressing the metabolic rate.
  • Endocrine Function: Low thyroid activity as well as low adrenal gland function will contribute to lowering the metabolic rate.
  • Digestion: Poor absorption and utilization of nutrients found in the foods that are consumed will result in decreased energy production on a cellular level, thereby, affecting metabolism. In turn, a lowered metabolic rate will have an adverse effect upon the digestion process, thereby creating a vicious cycle.
  • Viral Infections: A past occurrence of a severe or chronic viral infection can contribute to a decrease in the metabolic rate, due to the body’s neuro-immunological response to infection.
  • Physical Symptoms: After a prolonged period of time, a diminished metabolic rate, such as indicated in these test results, has been correlated with fatigue, cold hands and feet, easy weight gain and craving for sweets.
  • Even if a person is NOT overweight and is a SLOW metabolized, they can still have a lowered metabolic rate.  Overweight and underweight tendencies may not always be reflective of metabolism on the cellular level.

Slow Metabolizer – Type 1

  • Parasympathetic Dominance
  • Decreased Thyroid Function: A decreased secretion of hormones.
  • Increased Adrenal Activity: A decreased secretion of hormones.
  • A slow metabolic rate is associated with low or diminished energy production on a cellular level.  This is often due to a decrease in the body’s efficiency in utilizing many of the nutrients found in the foods that are consumed, or it may be a result of an improper diet which does not provide the necessary nutrients to begin with.
  • For a child, whatever the reason, an inability to obtain or utilize the proper nutrients at optimum efficiency can oftentimes contribute to symptoms such as fatigue and cold hands and feet.
  • Even though the child may not be overweight at this time, they can still have a lowered metabolic rate, as overweight and underweight tendencies may not always be reflective of cellular metabolism, especially in children.
  • A Slow Metabolizer Type 1 has these  associated characteristics:
    • adult onset diabetes
    • bradycardia (abnormally slow heart rate)
    • blood pressure (diastolic) may rise and remain elevated depending upon amount of hypothyroidism
    • calcium deposits in soft tissues
    • cold sensitivity in the extremities
    • constipation
    • copper (unbound, bio-unavailable) in excess
    • depression
    • fatigue
    • hypotension – abnormally low blood pressure  – especially postural
    • insomnia (Type 2) – falling asleep easily, but awakening frequently during the night. They
      sleep several hours a night, but often wakes up tired
    • hypoglycemia
    • hyporeflexia (below normal or absent reflexes)

Slow Metabolizer – Type 2

  • Parasympathetic Dominance
  • more coming soon

Slow Metabolizer – Type 3

  • Parasympathetic Dominance
  • more coming soon

Slow Metabolizer – Type 4

  • Parasympathetic Dominance
  • Thyroid Function: A tendency toward increased thyroid function and increased secretion of hormones.
  • Adrenal Activity: An increased secretion of hormones.
  • A strong tendency toward an acute stress reaction may occur. The stress may be physical in that there can be a necessary response due to a health-related problem, or there may be an emotionally related stress response.  This is a temporary reaction and will change when the stress is relieved.

About Fast Metabolic Types: These are the Key Features

  • Stress Burnout: Fast oxidizers often have “stress burnout” syndrome. Stress burnout is often associated with chronic or prolonged stress.  Stress is a normal part  of life and serves a useful purpose when it is controlled.  Chronic uncontrolled stress will eventually contribute to various vitamin and mineral imbalances and the ability to maintain adequate energy levels and optimum health will decrease.
  • Chronic Stress: If a stress has been present for an extended period of time, eventually the thyroid and adrenal glands can’t maintain sufficient energy production to keep up with stress demands. This pattern can result in periodic fatigue and depression.
  • Fast metabolizers have increased activity of adrenal and the thyroid glands.
  • Fast metabolizers convert nutrients into energy at a rapid rate, resulting in energy and mood swings unless the energy level remains constant.
  • Fast metabolizers are usually and function best under stress due to the body’s response of increasing energy production when confronted by a stressor, whether physical  or emotional.
  • Fast Metabolizers will eat frequently in order to maintain their energy level. This may result in weight gain in the abdominal region.
  • Fast metabolism may result in warm body temperature, moist skin and a tendency to perspire easily.

Fast Metabolism – Type 1

  • Sympathetic Dominance
  • Stress Seeking: starting several projects at once, and waiting to the last minute to meet deadlines are common descriptions of this type.
  • A Fast Metaboliser Type 1 has these  associated characteristics:
    • calcium and magnesium deficiency symptoms may develop
    • hyperthyroidism with hyperadrenia and hypo-parathyroidism
    • hyperglycemia episodes because of glucocorticoid-insulin antagonism.
    • hyper–reflexia
    • fine muscle tremors
    • insomnia with is the inability to fall asleep easily (type 1)
    • irritability
    • muscle cramps, especially at night
    • nervousness
    • noise sensitivity
    • tachycardia (abnormally rapid heart rate)
    • warm body temperature

Fast Metabolism – Type 2

  • Sympathetic Dominance
  • Tendency Toward Decreased Thyroid Function: A decreased secretion of hormones.
  • Tendency Toward Increased Adrenal Activity: An increased secretion of hormones.
  • The glandular imbalance associated with this type is usually the result of an acute stress reaction or possible inflammatory condition. This type is often associated with high energy. However, energy levels may fluctuate particularly when under stress.
  • This pattern is often associated with mood and energy swings.

Fast Metabolism – Type 3

  • Sympathetic Dominance
  • Increased Thyroid Function: A tendency toward increased thyroid function and decreased secretion of hormones.
  • Decreased Adrenal Activity: A decreased secretion of hormones. Even though the metabolic rate is considered fast, the person may be experiencing adrenal and thyroid insufficiency.
  • Prolonged Stress: This pattern is often associated with exposure to a rather strong and prolonged period of stress whether physical and/or emotional. This is described as the resistance or exhaustion stage of stress. There may be a noticeable drops in normal energy levels. This condition if chronic, can result in lowered resistance to infections and excessive metabolic activity.

Fast Metabolism – Type 4

  • This is a more common pattern in children. It reflects increased metabolic activity due to increased adrenal and thyroid function.
  • Sympathetic Dominance
  • Decreased Thyroid Function: A tendency toward decreased thyroid function and decreased secretion of hormones.
  • Decreased Adrenal Activity: A decreased secretion of hormones.
  • Even though the metabolic rate is considered fast, the person may be experiencing adrenal and thyroid insufficiency.
  • This pattern has the dominance of phosphorus relative to calcium, with existing thyroid and adrenal insufficiency and can be the result of prolonged   chronic stress.
  • Stress: This pattern is characteristic of a “stress burnout” syndrome and often associated with  chronic or prolonged stress. Stress has been  present for an extended period of time and eventually the thyroid and adrenal glands can no longer maintain sufficient energy production to keep up with stress demands. This pattern can result in periodic fatigue and depression.